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Mechanistic and clinical insights at the scleroderma-cancer interface

Abstract

Emerging data suggest tantalizing links between cancer and systemic inflammatory rheumatic syndromes. In scleroderma, patients may have an increased risk of cancer, secondary to chronic inflammation and damage from the disease, malignant transformation promoted by immunosuppressive therapies, a shared susceptibility to both cancer and autoimmunity, or a common inciting exposure. However, it is increasingly recognized that a subset of patients develop cancer around the time that scleroderma clinically manifests, raising the question of cancer-induced autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss data suggesting a mechanistic link between cancer and the development of scleroderma, and the clinical implications of these findings.

Post author correction

Article Type: REVIEW

Article Subject: Clinical Conditions and Organ Involvement

DOI:10.5301/jsrd.5000250

Authors

Ami A. Shah, Livia Casciola-Rosen

Article History

Disclosures

Financial support: This work was funded in part by the National Institutes of Health (K23 AR061439), the Scleroderma Research Foundation, the Donald B. and Dorothy L. Stabler Foundation, and the Jerome L. Greene Foundation.
Conflict of interest: None of the authors has financial interest related to this study to disclose.

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Authors

Affiliations

  • Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Baltimore, MD - USA

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